Tag Archives: U.S. Veterans

The Disgraceful Character of Obama

military pawn

The Joint Chiefs of Staff also have shown their lack of character and honor. They are cowards who do not have the backs of those who serve under them or of those who have ever served this country! May history remember them as the coward YES MEN that they are!

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We The Veterans

More Testimonies of Memorial Day at the Vietnam Wall Memorial and Arlington Cemetery

The thug n chief – Hussein obama – wanted his photo-op and like always, enjoyed demoralizing our Troops and Veterans.  Here is the bastards photo-op that is posted on the White House website.
Twana
I received this from a friend and have removed the E. Mail addresses.  Our usurper in chief is getting bolder and bolder.  We have to find a way to unite.”  Jim
I removed the several hundred names and address in the following emails. However, I know personally some of the folks involved and what is contained in the emails, for your information, is for real and written last night by some of the Vets involved.
Mike

Hey John,
Sorry to hear this happened to you and all the other Vets. In all the years I’ve gone to Arlington for Memorial Day, I don’t ever remember the gates to the cemetery being locked! Outrageous and another example of their need for total control of every venue. BTW, I watched the speech from the Amphitheater and the impression we all had was that it was ‘political in nature’ with his reaching out to the Vets just as he does to every other voting group. ”
Rae

All:
I just wanted a bunch of you to know about this travesty. When we were turned away from The Wall, I went to lay wreaths on my Mom and Dad and Brother and Sister’s graves at Arlington. Guess what? They had that closed for the great man too!!! Not sure who his canned audiences were at either place, but not many veterans like the thousands of guys I saw going away pretty angry. John

Today at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial…The Wall
Today as I usually do each Memorial Day and Veterans Day, I joined my fellow Soldiers I served with in Vietnam to lay a wreath for our fallen at the Vietnam Veterans Wall. We always gather at 0903 hours at the Three Soldier’s Monument. There we meet for a while and talk, see how everyone is doing, if anyone needs help, introduce any new guys from out of town who are visiting, new guys who are joining us for the first time, introduce any members of our family or friends who have come with us, always followed by a few remarks about fellow members of the Blackhorse Regiment who had passed since we had last gathered and then we welcome each other home. Today after walking across Memorial Bridge and rounding the Lincoln Memorial I saw our guys all gathering outside of a barricade around the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. When I joined them I found out to my total disbelief that we could not enter. No veterans allowed. The reason was that Obama was coming there to make a speech and the area was closed to everyone except special people with special passes until his speech was over 5 hours later. I was stunned. Thousands of Vietnam veterans gathering like us with wreaths in hand to recognize our fallen and turned away so that a politician could give a speech. Most of us had been there when Reagan spoke, Bush 41 and 43 had spoken, even Clinton, although most of us turned our backs on him in one of the largest, silent protests ever…seen by everyone…stinging in its impact…totally unreported by the media…but even then, we were not turned away. Today we were. I saw where in a poll where Obama is over 25 points behind Romney with Vets…if they all had seen what we experienced today and knew what had transpired, the spread would be much wider. I doubt if this will even be reported in the media. But, it should. This was not our day…it was their day…the boys who lost their lives. But it was their brothers day to come and touch their names on the Wall and remember them. It was also Decoration Day…the day we recognize those who gave all for all of us. It was not about our narcissist president and his attempt to appeal to the Vietnam Vets for votes. Shut out, we met next to a hot dog stand under a shade tree and held our semi-annual ritual for our fallen. Later that day, one of our men stayed behind and saw to it that the wreath was placed at that section of the Wall when we lost the most during the war. We won every battle in that war and were denied victory. We had to listen to an illiterate world say that we had lost our war. Our troops suffered more degradation, insult, hatred, and disgust from our countrymen than all other US troops from all wars combined. We came home to a country that didn’t want us…and to many countrymen who loathed us…but yet we persevered. Today…was just one more cut…but it was a cut that will not heal any time soon……..”

Wayne

Actions Not Words: Thank a Veteran

 

Actions Not Words / Blog of Dakota Meyer

 

 

Advocating for veteran support has long been a passion of mine.  I grew up learning of the struggles veterans face when returning to civilian life from my grandfather, a veteran Marine. Now, a veteran myself, I know all to well the difficulties our service members deal with, in their attempts to find a new reality once they return from combat.

I wanted to write this blog today because I think it’s hard for civilians to understand the position veterans are in, and why they face some of the issues that plague them after their military service is over.  I’m sure you’ve all read news articles highlighting the most common issues; homelessness, unemployment, the mental and physical conditions effecting many of our veterans.  But before you can begin trying to understand the cause of these issues, I think it’s important to consider the biggest struggle our veterans face and that’s the mental transition from active duty to civilian life.

The strength of our nation’s military is based on a team mentality; everyone does everything the same way at the same time.  While serving, there are very few opportunities to make a decision on your own; most decisions are made for you by your leaders.  Regardless of what branch you serve, all members dress the same, walk the same, eat the same, operate on the same rigid schedule.  Now imagine the challenges one might face when trying to transition from that type of existence, back to a normal civilian existence.  No one is there to tell you what to do and how to do it, anymore.

Many of our service members, and especially those returning from combat, have been living their life in situations where every decision could mean life or death.  Upon returning home from war, it’s difficult to find meaning in what most Americans know as everyday living.  There’s a scene in the movie The Hurt Locker, that I think really sums up the point I’m making.

Read the rest here.